Three Road Tripping Roads That Are People Free

Road tripping is fun. However, sitting in traffic is not. Here are the 3 of the finest crowd-free roadways to take a trip.

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Eyre Peninsula, South Australia

It’s a reasonably long haul to get to the Eyre Peninsula when you stay in Lorne accommodation – from the Nullarbor to the west, and a long day’s drive east of Adelaide. Trace the eastern coastline south from Whyalla to Port Lincoln and after that back up the western side to Ceduna for sensational seaside surroundings, wildlife, and exceptional seafood – road tripping doesn’t get far better than this.

Fantastic Inland Way, Queensland

Heading north to tropical Queensland? Head up Highway 1 and take the back way, also called Great Inland Way, through western NSW and Queensland– Sydney to Townsville via Dubbo, Lightning Ridge, Roma, Emerald, Carnarvon Gorge and Charters Towers. It’s sealed all the way and is a journey through beautiful small-town Australia– an Aussie version of America’s Route 66. How far? 2070km.

Beyond the Great Ocean Road, Victoria

Any visiting route as well-known as the Great Ocean Road is always going to bring in more than its reasonable share of slow-moving motorists who may be staying at Apollo Bay accommodation you cannot blame them, it’s a spectacular piece of roadway– that can turn it into a crawling conga-line of automobiles and caravans. However if you keep going, beyond the 12 Apostles, past the Bay of Islands, west of Warrnambool, you’ll leave the day-trippers and tour buses behind. Decrease when you get to Portland, where you can stroll to the edge of the greatest sea cliffs in Victoria to peer down at a large colony of about 650 fur seals then follow the curve of Discovery Bay to Nelson on the South Australian border and check out the back roads of the Limestone Coast. It’s just a half day’s drive, but will feel a million miles away. How far? 167km (Warrnambool to Nelson).

 

Prepare for your Australian trip with our practical tips

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Prepare for your Australian trip with our practical tips. Learn about our currency, how to call home, keep safe, shop responsibly and travel with a disability. Then you’re ready to go.

Money

Australia’s currency is Australian Dollars (AUD) and currency exchange is available at banks, hotels and international airports. The most commonly accepted credit cards are American Express, Bankcard, Diners Club, MasterCard, Visa, JCB and their affiliates. Try this handy currency converter.

Goods and Services Tax

Australia has a Goods and Services Tax (GST) of 10 per cent. You may be able to claim a refund of the GST paid on goods bought here if you have spent AUD$300 or more in one store, no more than 30 days before departing Australia. Tourist Refund Scheme facilities are located in the departure area of international terminals. For more detailed information see Australian government information on the Tourist Refund Scheme.

Shopping

You’ll find large department stores, arcades, malls, gift and souvenir shops across Australia. Trading hours vary across the country but shops in tourist and city areas are generally open until 6pm, with the exception of late night shopping on either Thursdays or Fridays in different states. In Australia you are covered by Australia’s consumer protection laws which require businesses to treat you fairly.

Tipping and bargaining

Hotels and restaurants do not add service charges to your bill. In up market restaurants, it is usual to tip waiters up to ten per cent of the bill for good service. However, tipping is always your choice. It is not custom to bargain in Australia.

Emergency assistance

The emergency number for police, ambulance and or fire brigade is 000.

Surf and water safety

Australia’s popular beaches are usually patrolled by volunteer lifesavers from October to April and red and yellow flags mark the safest area for swimming. For information about marine stingers and crocodile safety read the Queensland Government website.

Language

Australia’s official language is English. However, being a multicultural nation with a significant migrant population, we also enjoy a tremendous diversity of languages and cultures.

Electrical power points

Our electrical current is 220 – 240 volts, AC 50Hz. The Australian three-pin power outlet is different from some other countries, so you may need an adaptor.

Communication

Australia’s country code is 61. Local calls from public pay phones are untimed and charged at AUD$.050. Mobile, long distance and overseas calls are usually timed.Mobile phone network coverage is available across Australia, however coverage may be limited in some remote areas. Internet access is widely available at internet cafes, accommodation and libraries.

Postal services

Post offices are usually open 9am – 5pm, Monday to Friday, with some city post offices open on Saturday morning. Travellers can arrange to collect mail at post offices throughout Australia.

Accessible Travel

If you have a disability and are planning to explore Australia, there is a host of services and special deals to meet your needs. Thorough preparation is essential to a successful trip, so speak to your travel agent about your specific requirements. For more information on accessible tourism in Australia go to NICAN or the AustraliaForAll  websites.

 

Article taken rom http://www.australia.com/en/planning/useful-tips.html